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Adventurous Journey

To stimulate a spirit of adventure and discovery whilst undertaking a journey in a group.

The Adventurous Journey is all about getting out and going on an expedition or exploration in an unfamiliar and challenging environment, with a clear purpose. More than any other Section of The Duke of Ed, the Adventurous Journey is about team work and social connection with both the team members who will undertake the journey, and also the Volunteers who instruct, supervise and assess the journey.

At the heart of the Adventurous Journey, is the opportunity for a young person to engage in activities that require determination, physical effort, perseverance, problem solving and cooperation. It is hoped that all who undertake this Section of The Duke of Ed, are rewarded with a unique, challenging and memorable experience.

Get inspired through Stories on others Adventurous Journeys!

Being in a challenging environment, Participants will experience highs and lows both throughout the preparation and training, and the actual journeys themselves. Personal dedication and perseverance are required for the Adventurous Journey, and some Participants will find the challenge is much harder than they anticipated.

The rewards at the completion of the qualifying journey, however, are hard to match – elation, a real sense of achievement, self-confidence, trust, and belief in oneself and others. Some of the benefits of Adventurous Journey’s include:

  • It takes determination: Being in an unfamiliar environment with only your own planning and your team to support you is not to be taken lightly – there are plenty of people who would shy away from this.
  • You might surprise yourself: Sometimes it’s easier to think you won’t be able to do something, rather than actually trying to do it. Get out there and give it a go – you might just climb that mountain!
  • You can do it with your friends, and you might make some new ones along the way: Without a team, the adventurous journey can’t happen. This is a great way to spend quality time with your friends, and a great opportunity to forge new friendships.
  • You will feel amazing: When you get to the top of a mountain or the end of the track, and look how far you have come, the sense of achievement is hard to beat.
  • You can get away from the city, you can get away from the country: whatever your usual environment, you have the opportunity to get away from it and experience a few days somewhere totally different.
  • You will learn some really useful skills: Even the preparation and training for the journeys open up opportunities to develop new skills, such as first aid. When on the journey itself, you will learn to rely on yourself like you have never done before, not to mention learning about true team work.
  • It is fun: Challenging, yes. Fun, even more so. Getting out there with your friends, exploring Australia or another country… what more could you want in an experience?

All Adventurous Journey requirements must be considered with reference to any applicable State or Territory Government requirements, adventure activity standards or industry guidelines.

For this Section, Participants must:

  1. Have a clearly defined purpose for each journey.
  2. Undertake preparation and training which is relevant to their planned journey and skill level.
    Note: Sufficient preparation and training is required at each level of The Duke of Ed to ensure all journeys are safe.
  3. Ensure they discuss and get approval from their Award Leader prior to undertaking Adventurous Journeys. This includes all practice journeys and all qualifying journeys.
  4. Obtain written parent/guardian consent prior to departing on each journey (if they are under the age of 18).
  5. Be supervised and also assessed by suitably skilled, experienced and/or qualified Volunteer(s).
  6. Ensure there are a minimum of four (4) people in each Adventurous Journey group (with a maximum of seven (7)). Groups larger than 7 should be split into smaller sub-groups.
  7. Endeavour to undertake their Adventurous Journey(s) with peer group who will make decisions together.
  8. Ensure both the practice journey and qualifying journeys are of a similar nature and duration, and are in a similar environment (but not over the same route). These journeys must be using the same mode of travel (e.g. canoeing, walking etc).
  9. Undertake sufficient practice journeys to ensure that the qualifying journey is safe. At least one practice journey is required at each level of The Duke of Ed.
  10. Only utilise simple self-catering accommodation (e.g. shelters, tents, hostels).
  11. Ensure the qualifying Adventurous Journey meets the minimum time requirements for the chosen level of The Duke of Ed.
  12. Upon completion of the practice and qualifying journeys, submit/present a journey report to their Assessor.
  13. Undertake activities substantially in their own time. This means that whilst some activity may take place within school, university or work hours, most of it should occur outside of these scheduled times.

The safety of young people is a priority. It is worth emphasising that an Adventurous Journey, by its nature, contains an element of risk. It is important that this risk is properly identified, assessed and managed to reduce the likelihood of an accident or emergency occurring, and decrease the consequences if an accident or emergency occurs.

The key to this is the proper preparation and training of the Participants so that they can safely undertake their practice journey and their independent qualifying journey.

The following competencies will require signoff and/or training prior to the practice journey:

  • understanding of the Adventurous Journey.
  • first aid and emergency procedures (relevant to the type of journey or environment).
  • safety and safe practice (relevant to the type of journey or environment).
  • route planning and navigation (use of maps or street directories).
  • campcraft/accommodation.
  • team building and leadership training.
  • preparation of food and cooking.
  • environmental awareness and care.
  • necessary equipment and how to use it.
  • technical skills in the mode of travel.
  • observation and recording skills.

Duke of Ed Victoria advises that all groups should follow the planning and preparation guidelines below:

The nature and level of supervision will be determined by the Supervisor and approved by the Award Unit, taking into consideration a range of factors such as the competence of the party, age, physical ability, mode of travel, location and remoteness of location.

In most cases the supervision should take place at a distance. The Supervisor should, as a minimum, make personal contact, such as meeting up or speaking via phone with the group at least once each day. If it is considered essential that an adult accompany the group, he or she must not interfere with the group’s decisions or purpose (unless safety is a concern) as this would detract from the essential independence, responsibility and challenge of this Section.

The Supervisor:

  •  Is appointed by the Award Unit and is responsible for the group’s safety while on the journey
  • Needs to be familiar with the Adventurous Journey Section and must be highly competent in the activity/mode of journey
  • Even if the Supervisor has assisted with the training or undertaken the training for the journey, they must still check and be satisfied that the Participants are properly trained and equipped to undertake the planned and approved journey
  • May also be the Assessor
  • Must provide feedback on the team’s strengths and weaknesses that needs to be addressed during and after the Practice Journey(s)

Please note that the Supervisor can be a different person for each journey, and there can also be more than one Supervisor for each journey.

There are two types of Adventurous Journeys: an Expedition or Exploration.

An Expedition is a journey with a purpose. In an expedition, the primary focus in on the journeying. More time is devoted to this with less time and effort spent on research and gathering information.

An Exploration is a purpose with a journey. In an exploration, the primary focus is to observe and collect information relevant to the purpose. More time and effort is spent on this, and consequently less time is devoted to getting from one place to another. The journeying aspect in an exploration remains significant, with a minimum of one third of the planned activity hours being spent on journeying.

Expedition
• Bushwalking
• Canoeing
• Camping
• Cross country skiing
• Cycling
• Horse riding
• Rowing
• Sailing

Exploration
• Cultural trip (language studies)
• Historical trip
• Marine study
• Rock-climbing
• Scientific exploration
• Survey of national wildlife park

What are the types of Adventurous Journeys?
There are two types of Adventurous Journeys:
1. Expedition:
An expedition is a journey with a purpose. In an expedition, the primary focus is on the journeying. More time is devoted to this with less time and effort spent on research and gathering information.
2. Exploration:
An exploration is a purpose with a journey. In an exploration, the primary focus is to observe and collect information relevant to the purpose. More time and effort is spent on this, and consequently less time is devoted to getting from one place to another. The journeying aspect in an exploration remains significant, with a minimum of one third of the planned activity hours being spent on journeying.

What is the difference between a Practice Journey and a Qualifying Journey?
The purpose of a Practice Journey is to gain experience and skills to prepare you for your Qualifying Journey. The Qualifying Journey if your final Adventurous Journey in which you apply all the skills and knowledge you’ve learnt to fully plan, prepare and undertake the challenge.

Practice Journeys cannot travel over the same route as the Qualifying Journey, but must be similar in:
• Mode of travel
• Focus and duration
• Environment and accommodation

For more information on Adventurous Journeys please download and refer to The Duke of Ed: Handbook